Bagni di Lucca’s Wedding Bells

Places where marriage ceremonies, both civil and religious, may be performed have widened considerably over the years.

High flyers may like this setting:

air-wedding-2-display-tm

Those who are in a hurry to get away to their honeymoon destination may prefer this vehicle combination:

hot-rod-wedding-tm

If both spouses are Pisceans then this could be an option:

picture-2-79-tm

If you love getting to the top of things, especially mountains, then you could emulate this Nepalese couple who got married on Mount Everest’s summit.

w020050613333852324736-tm

Bagni di Lucca comune doesn’t offer these options. Instead it offers a delightful location amid verdant hills and picturesque villages in a beautiful part of Tuscany.

There are three sites currently available where civil marriages can take place. They are:

  • The comune (or town hall) of Bagni di Lucca
  • The casinò (or ex-gambling hall) of the comune.
  • The circolo dei forestieri (or foreigners’ club)

There is talk of adding a fourth – the old English church (now turned partly into a library).

All venues are old and atmospheric. Bagni’s town hall has a nice feel to it and the council chamber is used for the ceremony.

On the walls are various paintings including one showing Christopher Columbus discovering America and then finding that a Lucchese had already got there before and was selling him a plaster-of-Paris statuette, for which local industries are famous. (See the museum at Coreglia Antelminelli at http://comune.coreglia.lu.it/index.php?option=com_inform&view=article&id=56)

DSCN8243

The town hall’s back garden could do with a spruce-up, however. Perhaps a rose garden might be in place here.

DSCN8252

Last week I was present with a friend as one of the two witnesses required in Italy at a civil marriage ceremony in the town hall. Witnesses don’t have to be residents of Bagni di Lucca.  This was the first Italian civil marriage ceremony I have contributed to, although I have on two previous occasions helped out in arrangements afterwards.

The ceremony was performed by the mayor Dr. Massimo Betti wearing his mayoral tri-colour sash, and was both solemn and charming. Solemn because there are quite a few articles in Italian law relating to wedding partner obligations that have to be read out – it’s not just a matter of “will you etc.”.

DSCN8254

An interpreter was present and at the end we confirmed that we had heard and understood everything that was said and contributed to signing the marriage certificate.

10415633_1456914504548374_6671196263043034035_n

The newly-weds were then applauded and also given a special hand-made-paper wedding certificate and flowers from the mayor.

DSCN8255

(PS I’m wearing the same tie I wore at my own wedding…)

In all – including the photographer – there were seven people present in the town hall, one more than at our own wedding which took place in the last century at Caxton Hall, Westminster, London.

A quiet wedding, certainly but clearly one very important day in the lives of the couple. Coincidentally, the mayor told them that he had two relatives living in the midland city where they hailed from. Wonders never cease!

For more information about how one can get married in Italy do contact Lisa Redgrave whose web-site is at

http://www.hitchedinitaly.com/aboutus.php

and who has already arranged many such wedding ceremonies with the greatest of success.

 

Advertisements

3 thoughts on “Bagni di Lucca’s Wedding Bells

  1. Lisa is wonderful! We are all very excited for our American nephew and fiancee’s wedding. The ceremony will be held in the church at Pieve di Monti di Villa, the village of my father’s birth and where I have been visiting for many decades now. I’m excited to share the wonderful atmosphere of the Bagni di Lucca area with the many guests who will be travelling for this event.
    Thank you for your wonderful blog. I enjoy every one of yours posts and have learned quite a lot from them.

  2. Pingback: Shiver me Timbers | From London to Longoio (and Lucca and Beyond) Part Two

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s